Treating mothers’ diabetes in pregnancy found to cut risk of obesity for children.

Title: Treating mothers’ diabetes in pregnancy found to cut risk¬†of obesity for children.

Description:

Treating pregnant women for diabetes can help lower the chances their children will be obese, researchers found.

Content:

Treating pregnant women for diabetes can help lower the chances their children will be obese, researchers found. Untreated gestational diabetes, which raises a woman’s blood sugar during pregnancy, almost doubles the child’s risk of becoming obese by ages 5 to 7, according to a study in the September issue of Diabetes Care, published by the American Diabetes Association. Researchers found that children’s risk of¬†becoming obese is lowered in women who are treated for the condition. This is the largest study to examine the issue and the first to show that treating diabetes during pregnancy can lower a child’s risk of becoming obese.
“This information will encourage women to take their diabetes treatment seriously during pregnancy and realize that there’s potentially long-term benefits for their child,” said Teresa Hillier, the study’s lead author, a doctor and senior investigator at Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon. Researchers in the study examined the records of 9,439 mother-child pairs in Oregon, Washington and Hawaii. The women were screened during pregnancy for blood sugar levels and gestational diabetes. The children in the study had their weight measured between the ages of five and seven, a period when weight is a strong predictor of adult obesity. The researchers then analyzed the link between a mother’s blood sugar and childhood obesity. Children of mothers with high blood sugar levels who weren’t treated during pregnancy were 89 percent more likely to be overweight and 82 percent more likely to be obese by the time they were five to seven years old, compared with mothers who had normal blood sugar levels, according to the study.

Treating gestational diabetes lowers a child’s risk of becoming obese during childhood to the same levels of those mothers with normal sugar levels, according to researchers.

Source:

http://www.boston.com/news

Disclaimer:

Any views or opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent those of The Federation of Antenatal Educators (FEDANT) unless specifically stated.

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